G-Shock frenzy

Every few years a G-Shock frenzy takes me over. Indeed it has just done so.  I’ve recently been enjoying my negative display, square DW-5600MS and decided to splash out on its sister model, the DW-6900MS. G-Shock Aficionados will be aware that the “MS” stands for Military Series and implies that the watches may be usefully configured for those in the military. They are however far more likely to have been configured for those who wish to be in the military, in high speed, low drag tactical operator kind of way. I am too old for that sort of nonsense.

I do however like a nice looking watch and to my eye, the DW-6900MS is attractive. Yet, it features a pedestrian module, offering only basic time, alarm, count-down and stopwatch functions. There is no solar power or syncing with atomic clocks. The “eyes” above the main display, simply acts as visual counters. The accompanying strap is not inflexible plastic, featuring the module number in faux stencilled military block writing. How naff. Many people find the negative LCD display with its pinkish hue, incredibly difficult to read in many lighting conditions. So why did I buy it?

One simple change to the watch makes it a joy to wear. By adding a Casio – combi-bracelet to replace the rather stiff default strap, the comfort level of the watch increases immeasurably . I’ve already done this to a GW-6900 so I know it works. I’ve also fitted one to my DW-5600MS, again to improve the comfort of the rather ordinary plastic strap. I ordered my DW-6900MS from Hong Kong, as they can be difficult to find in the UK at a sensible price. I managed to acquire one for £62 including shipping. Hopefully it will wend its way past customs, surreptitiously.

It may astonish non-watch fans that the combi-bracelet costs the same as the watch. The combi-strap may not look entirely elegant but it is the perfect accompaniment for a G-shock. It’s incredibly easy to add and remove links as these are held in place with nothing more complicated than spring bars, which normally attach a strap to a watch case between the lugs. It’s a brilliantly simple system, that allows you to use any spring-bar tool, or even a small screwdriver, to ensure a perfect fit. This is almost guaranteed by Casio placing four adjustment points on the clasp. If only every bracelet were this convenient and secure.  It also shows, I hope, how much watch fun one can have with very cheap, yet functional, watches and parts. Who needs a Rolex?

Look into the eyes, not around the eyes.

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